RSS Arthritis

For Benefactors and Sponsors of the Santa Barbara Behavioral Health Educational Series

Help build Santa Barbara's Behavioral Health and Resilience Multiplier

SPONSORSHIP PACKAGES:

  • Our Initial Donation Goal for this Project is $100,000.

USE OF FUNDS:

  • Making behavioral health and resilience programs freely available to economically disadvantaged, minority, and vulnerable members of the community.
  • Refining the existing programs, including the 5G Collaborative Dojo.
  • Building, testing, and marketing special programs for Self Care.
  • Developing other special educational programs in this Behavioral Health Series.

DONATIONS:

  • Please make your tax-deductible contribution payable directly to “Resilient Santa Barbara Fund” at the Santa Barbara Foundation
  • Donations beginning at $20 are welcome to help us reach our funding goal. Donations of $100 or more receive additional benefits as detailed below.

Springs of Amethysts - $100

  • Public Recognition as a Community Health Charter Sponsor
  • Signed copy of Piloting through Chaos—The Explorer’s Mind (Julian Gresser/2013)
  • Free gift of the 5 Minutes to Resilience web app


Rivulets of Moonstones - $500

  • All of the above awards (except memberships) plus:
  • 2 Free Gift Memberships in the 5G Collaborative Dojo, including in-person monthly meetings


Sparkles of Opal - $1K

  • All of the above awards (except memberships) plus:
  • Public lecture in your honor
  • 4 Free Gift Memberships in the 5G Collaborative Dojo, including in-person monthly meetings


Fountains of Pearls - $5K

  • All of the above awards (except memberships) plus:
  • ½ day workshop training and consultation with any organization or company of your choice in Santa Barbara
  • 20 Free Gift Memberships in the 5G Collaborative Dojo, including in-person monthly meetings


Jade Eddies - $10K

  • All of the above awards (except memberships) plus:
  • Two ½ day workshop, training and consultation with any organization or company of your choice in Santa Barbara
  • 40 Free Gift Memberships in the 5G Collaborative Dojo, including in-person monthly meetings


Sapphire Brooks of Laughing Hearts - $25K

  • All of the above awards (except memberships) plus:
  • 100 Free Gift Memberships in the 5G Collaborative Dojo, including in-person monthly meetings
  • 1 day of professional consultation and meetings

Contact Us


Ruby Streams of Laughing Hearts - $35K

  • All of the above awards (except memberships) plus:
  • 150 Free Gift Memberships in the 5G Collaborative Dojo, including in-person monthly meetings
  • One full day training program with materials for organization of choice to you.

Contact Us


Emerald Rivers of Laughing Hearts - $50K

  • All of the above awards (except memberships) plus:
  • 200 Free Gift Memberships in the 5G Collaborative Dojo, including in-person monthly meetings
  • Two full day training programs with materials for organizations of your choice.

Contact Us


Diamond Rivers of Laughing Hearts - $100K

  • All of the above awards (except memberships) plus:
  • 400 Free Gift Memberships in the 5G Collaborative Dojo, including in-person monthly meetings
  • Four full day training programs with materials for organizations of your choice.

Contact Us

Arthritis

Some studies suggest people with higher levels of resilience tend to recover faster from both osteo and rheumatoid arthritis, manage pain better, are less susceptible to chronic depression and anxiety, and have improved overall health outcomes.

The annual cost to the U.S. of osteo- and rheumatoid arthritis and related conditions is estimated at $86 billion. As in other areas, the suffering in economically disadvantaged, minority, and vulnerable populations is greater than affluent communities.

Although there is evidence that the progression of both osteo and rheumatoid arthritis can be slowed and even reversed, a greater part of the literature focuses on the elements of a resilient management of depression and pain. For example:

  • A body of research shows that people who demonstrate higher levels of resilience tend to recover faster, manage pain better, be less susceptible to chronic depression and anxiety, and have better overall health outcomes than those who are less resilient.

The conclusion of these and other studies is that resilience is a skill that can be developed and honed over time. The following strategies are recommended by experts in the field.

  • Focus on the upside. Studies show that optimism is part and parcel of resilience; the more hopeful you feel, the more resilient you’ll be.
  • Learn from experience. If you have a chronic disease, you’re already more resilient than you probably give yourself credit for.
  • Expand your knowledge. Learning boosts resilience. The more you learn about how best to live with your condition, the more control you have. Control as well as resourcefulness give you the confidence to move forward in the face of adversity.”
  • Find your bliss.Make time to find and do things you love.
  • Get moving.In addition to its physical benefits, exercise “decreases anxiety and depression, improves sleep and increases the levels of mood-improving chemicals, including brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), a protein that improves brain health.”
  • Seek support.Support systems are a linchpin of resilience
  • Count your blessings. Researchers at the University of California, Riverside reviewed 225 studies and found that individuals who expressed gratitude or wrote in a gratitude journal at least several times a week felt more connected, autonomous, optimistic and happy – traits that contribute to resilience. “Gratitude makes you think about what you have, which, in turn, keeps you from focusing on what you don’t have. When you feel blessed, it’s easier to keep going – no matter what you’re up against.

Specific references:

  • One study published in the Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology looked at 300 women with RA and found that those who scored high on resilience questionnaires reported less RA-related pain than those with lower scores.
  • A study published in the Annals of Behavioral Medicine looked at 275 patients with knee OA and found that those who exhibited the most resilience-related characteristics were also the most likely to show self-efficacy – for example, taking the initiative to see a physician or to exercise regularly. They also reported less pain and an increased ability to perform everyday activities compared with less resilient study participants.
  • Focus on the upside.  Boosting your optimism requires you to “reframe your experience so that you’re aware of the negative, but focused on the positive,” says David Hellerstein, MD, professor of clinical psychiatry at Columbia University’s College of Physicians and Surgeons in New York City.
  • Learn from experience. If you have a chronic disease, you’re already more resilient than you probably give yourself credit for, says Patricia O’Gorman, PhD, a psychologist in Albany, N.Y., who specializes in trauma and resilience. “When you’re dealing with a new setback, that’s the time to ask yourself, ‘How have I dealt with problems in the past? When pianist Lisa Emrich, 43, was diagnosed with RA she took this approach, drawing on her experience with multiple sclerosis. “I saw a doctor right away, kept getting tested until I had a diagnosis, and worked with my physician to formulate a plan – in this case, medication plus occupational therapy, which ultimately allowed me to return to playing the piano,” she says.
  • Expand your knowledge.  “Learning boosts resilience,” says Dr. Hellerstein. “The more you learn about how best to live with your condition, the more control you have. Control as well as resourcefulness give you the confidence to move forward in the face of adversity.”
  • Find your bliss.Make time to find and do things you love. As resilience researchers at the University of California, Riverside, wrote for the Handbook of Adult Resilience (Guilford Press, 2010), “emotions like joy, satisfaction and interest … provide individuals with a sort of ‘psychological time-out’ in the face of stress and help them perceive the ‘big picture’ of their situations.”
  • Get moving.In addition to its physical benefits, exercise “decreases anxiety and depression, improves sleep and increases the levels of mood-improving chemicals, including brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), a protein that improves brain health,” says Dr. Hellerstein. Studies have shown that physically fit people don’t experience the same spikes in blood pressure and stress hormones such as cortisol in stressful situations.
  • Seek support.Support systems are a linchpin of resilience. “If you don’t feel like you have to go it alone, it’s much easier to persevere.”
  • Count your blessings. Researchers at the University of California, Riverside reviewed 225 studies and found that individuals who expressed gratitude or wrote in a gratitude journal at least several times a week felt more connected, autonomous, optimistic and happy – traits that contribute to resilience. “Gratitude makes you think about what you have, which, in turn, keeps you from focusing on what you don’t have,” says Wicks. “When you feel blessed, it’s easier to keep going – no matter what you’re up against.”

Notes:

 

Next: Breast Cancer

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